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Things to See in the Languedoc:   Historic Villages and Bastides:   Rennes-le-Château

 Rennes-le-Chateau from the air.  title= Rennes-le-Château is a small village perched on a hilltop near Couiza in the Aude département.  It has become world famous in the last few years following the publication of a series of books dealing with a mystery concerning a nineteenth century priest who lived in the village. It is not far away from a spa town called Rennes-les-Bains

 Rennes-le-Château. The Magdelene Tower  Rennes-le-Château. 'Digging Prohibitted' At the heart of the mystery is the fact that the priest (abbé Bérenger Saunière) suddenly become immensely rich during the 1880s.  

There are a few interesting aspects of the mystery, such as where his money came from, but improbable theories have been built on a few known facts and shorn up by mass of demonstrable falsehoods.  Over the last twenty years a series of best-selling books have been published, each proposing a more fantastic theory than its predecessors.

 A photograph of the Abbé 
                    Bérenger Saunière AsmodeusSaunier probably made his money by robbing ancient graves or selling masses, or both. One of the few reliable facts about Rennes-le-Château is that it was once a large Visigothic city with a population of 20,000 or even 30,000, so it is is not impossible that he found a trove of treasure, perhaps while restoring his Church. (At the start of the Crusade against the Cathars the Trencavels were viscounts not only of Carcassonne and and Béziers, but also of a vast area called the Razès, the capital of which was Rennes-le-Château - then called Raedae)

 

Trajan's Column in Rome commemorates the looting of the Jerusalem Temple - This scence shows the Menorah being carried offAttractive as the simple "treasure" theory is, there are much more interesting elaborations, namely that Saunier:
  • discovered a cache of treasure from Solomon's Temple in Jerusalem, including the Menorah or the Ark of the Covenant, or both, taken from Jerusalem by the Romans (true - see right) and later from the Romans by the Visigoths (not as absurd as it sounds - the Visigoths did sack Rome in 410 and bring their loot back to Toulouse. Genseric, King of the Vandals, sacked Rome again in 455 and removed the new Temple treasures to Carthage. There they were captured by Belisarius on behalf of Emperor Justinian who took them to Constantinople. Justinian sent the Menorah back to Jerusalem, from where it disappeared, apparently looted by the Persians in 614.
  • discovered a cache of treasure hidden by the Cathars who escaped from the Château of Montségur ( The Name in Occitan. Click here to find out more about occitan. Montsegùr) in 1244.
  • discovered treasure buried by the Knights Templar when the Order was attacked by the French King in 1309.
  • discovered treasure of the Lords of Rennes-le-Château (who are said to have used the crypt as grave tomb). The priest supposedly found documents and valuables hidden there since the time of the Saracen occupation.
  • discovered treasure of the Kingdom of Majorca.Pretend Holy Grail.
  • discovered some hidden item of inestimable value (such as the Holy Grail or Charlemagne's sword).
  • discovered documents so damaging to the Roman Church that the Vatican paid a fortune to suppress them.
  • was financially assisted by space aliens.

Many of the theories revolve around a supposition that the artist Nicolas Poussin was party to some great secret, and that he encoded information about it in his paintings - notably the painting known as the Shepherds in Arcadia, shown here on the right. According to some the painting was done in the Languedoc, with Rennes-le-Château in the background. A local farmer near Arques had the misfortune to have a (recent) tomb on his land which looked vaguely like the one in the painting. He got so sick of visiting treasure hunters tramping over his fields that he acquired some explosives and blew it up. It didn't work. Now treasure hunters turn up to see the site where it once stood.

 Rennes-le-Château. Cover of 'The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail' If you are interested in the mystery, Click one of the links below or read The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail, the first book in English to discuss the mystery.  Be warned that one of the principal sources (Pierre Plantard) turned out to be a fantasist.  

On the other hand many of its improbably assertions turn out to be true. For example, there really is an ancient tradition that the family of Jesus Christ came to live in the Languedoc, and that Mary Magdelene was the wife or concubine of Jesus. (For the first see the page on Saintes-Maries-de-la-Mer. For the second see a page of original accusations against the Cathars)

Gérard de Sède was the French historian who originally popularised the mystery of Rennes-le-Château (well before the Holy Blood and the Holy Grail). For his obituary from the Independent, 24 June 2004, by Marcus Williamson, click here Next.

Richard Leigh was one of the co-authors of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail. For his obituary from the Independent, 29 November 2007, by Marcus Williamson, click here Next.

Click on the following link to read an article about Rennes-le-ChâteauNext.

Click on the following link for recommended Books on the mystery of Rennes-le-ChâteauNext.

The following are links to external sites, which will open in a new window.

www.henrylincoln.co.uk/ Henry Lincoln's Website

www.languedocmysteries.info/rennes.htm Rennes-le-Chateau and the Mysteries of the Languedoc

www.renneslechateaubooks.info/languedocrennes Recommended books

www.connectotel.com/rennes/ Excellent site on Rennes-le-Château

www.rlcresearch.com Another excellent site on Rennes-le-Château, with lots of good links

www.andrewgough.com/ Excellent site featuring news, articles and interviews with RLC researchers like Jean-Luc Robin, Henry Lincoln and Philip Coppens.

www.rennes-le-château.fr/

www.benhammott.com/ research website by Ben Hammott investigating the Mystery of Berenger Sauniere.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Some more books on Rennes-le-Château and its mysteries:

US:   

UK:   

France:    

 

Photo Gallery

Rennes-le-Château seen from St Ferriol

 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 

Bugarach seen from Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

Sauniere's House (the Villa Bethany) at Rennes-le-Château

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château. The Latin legend over the door translates as "This is a terrible place"
or more accurately "This is an awesome place" in the pre 2000 sense.

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château is dedicated to Mary Magdelene

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château.
There are statues of both Joseph and Mary holding babies,
causing some amateur theorists to believe that Jesus was one of twins,
the other being Thomas Dydimus
(the names Thomas {Aramaic Tau'ma} and Didymus {Greek} both mean "twin")

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château. Saint Roch, a favourite local saint.

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château. Jesus and Friends.

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château. Asmodeus supporting the holy water stoup

 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château. Asmodeus supporting the holy water stoup

 

The Château at Rennes-le-Château

 
 
 

The Church at Rennes-le-Château

 

The Château at Rennes-le-Château

 

Bugarach seen from Rennes-le-Château

 
 
 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

La Tour Magdela, Sauniere's library, at Rennes-le-Château

 
 
 

Outside the Church at Rennes-le-Château

 

Outside the Church at Rennes-le-Château - entrance to the graveyard

 

Outside the Church at Rennes-le-Château

 

In the village at Rennes-le-Château

 

The Château at Rennes-le-Château

 

The Château at Rennes-le-Château

 

Coustaussa seen from Rennes-le-Château

 

 

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Asmodeus: supporting the holy water stoop in the church at Rennes-le-Château.
   


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